Louise Glück: Life and Poetry
Poetry

Louise Glück: Life and Poetry

American writer Louise Glück was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for an accurate poetic voice that makes the individual daily life into the universal well-being by its raging beauty. Such a decision by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences became unexpected for everyone. Why?

Louise Glück: Life and Poetry
Louise Glück: Life and Poetry

Who Is This Writer?

Louise Glück is one of the most award-winning living classics among U.S. poets, and her most important literary award perhaps show the Nobel Committee’s reluctance to support one side in today’s world of boiling ideological disputes. Glück is currently a professor of English at Yale University. In total, she has published 12 collections of poetry, the theme of which is what is most important to man: life and death, love, the tragedy of being.

The home of Nobel Laureate in Literature Glück, who is one of the most respected poets in the United States, has almost all the major American and world literary awards: the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, the Tom Tranströmer Prize, and many more. From 2003 to 2004, Glück became a laureate of the Library of Congress. This is the greatest honor an American poet can receive. The poetry of Glück has long been the subject of academic research, and the fact that the poet is not well known outside the United States is largely explained by the fact that poetry is difficult to translate well.

The Features of Her Poetry

The poetry of Louise Glück is characterized by a tone of confession and a reflection of personal experience. The writer uses few means of expression. She writes in a classical manner, her language is accurate, the tone is always strict. She rarely uses rhymes, as she mainly uses repetitions, metric separation of syntactically related words, and other ways to maintain a poetic rhythm.

Her book debuted in the book Firstborn, which appeared in 1968 and was well received by critics. This successful start was followed by a long creative crisis. Glück received an offer to try to teach, but at the time she was convinced that poets cannot teach others, but she accepted the offer. When she started teaching, she felt happy again. The creative crisis was over, and her second book, The House on Marshland, was published in 1975, and she herself received the Solomon R. Guggenheim Scholarship for exceptional creative talent.

The tragedy of September 11, 2001 became the sparkle to create the poem October (2004). This was followed by Averno (2006), A Village Life (2009), Poems (1962–2012, published in 2012), and the book Faithful and Virtuous Night (2014).

The Non-Politicized Nobel As a Tribute to Literature

With the world shaking in a wide variety of chaos such as social, political, economic, ethical, ecological, and epidemiological problems, it is natural that in 2020, a tremendous amount was expected from the Nobel Prize in Literature. It had to be something like a conceptual statement detached from politics and devoted exclusively to literature. Among the candidates were such well-known writers as Maryse Condé, Liudmila Ulickaja, Joanne Rowling, Stephen King, and Michel Houellebecq. By choosing to announce the winner Louise Glück, a calm, respected, decent, time-tested personality, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences did not want to identify with any requirement of nowadays world and awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature as a tribute to literature itself

The Non-Politicized Nobel As a Tribute to Literature
The Non-Politicized Nobel As a Tribute to Literature

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